THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON November 21, 2015 @ 6:24 am
Avalanche Advisory published on November 20, 2015 @ 6:24 am
Issued by Andy Anderson - Tahoe National Forest

The avalanche danger remains LOW on on all aspects and elevations. While avalanches have become unlikely, they are not impossible. Small avalanches can still occur in isolated areas or extreme terrain during LOW danger. Continue to use caution and watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features when traveling in the backcountry. It early season and numerous hard immovable objects remain exposed or just barely covered. 

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Normal Caution
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

The snowpack continues to slowly consolidate in most places. This settlement and consolidation combined with calm warm weather and a shallow snowpack with lots of anchors (aka snowmobile, board, ski, and knee destroying obstacles) will keep avalanche activity unlikely again today. Some unstable snow may still exist in small isolated areas where the sugary snow layers (facets) in the bottom half of the snowpack remain weak or in complex or extreme terrain or on unsupported slopes. These areas could include those tempting filled-in looking couliors or hanging snowfields with cliffs below them or some isolated areas on shaded and sheltered NW-N-NE aspects.

recent observations

Yesterday variable conditions existed on Tamarack Peak. Snow surface conditions ranged from wet and sticky in the sun to breakable crust in areas with that get some sun to cold unconsolidated snow on shaded and sheltered N aspects. Exposed near and above treeline N-NE-E aspects held wind scoured snow surfaces. Snow coverage varied greatly by aspect as well with the northerly aspects holding 10-24 inches of snow while other aspects held much less snow. Many of the southerly aspects have completely melted out. 

Below the surface on northerly aspects the snowpack consisted of an upper layer of consolidating recent snow on top of a layer of weaker sugary snow (facets). In most areas snowpit tests targeting this weaker layer showed signs of consolidating and strengthening, but at least one location yielded results indicating that it remains weak and that fractures can travel along the weak layer.

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

The high pressure ridge over the region will keep the weather warm and dry for the next few days. The forecast calls for daytime highs today and tomorrow to remain slightly cooler than yesterday due to some cloud cover moving into the region. Winds should remain light to moderate and should shift from the east back to the south over then next 36 hours. Calm clear weather continues to allow cold air to settle into the valleys during the night. This temperature inversion means that like the last few days air temperatures at the lower elevations dropped lower than those at the upper elevations again last night. As the day warms up, this inversion should lift.   

Weather observations from along the Sierra Crest between 8200 ft. and 8800 ft.
0600 temperature: 32 to 40 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 42 to 53 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: West to Northeast
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 10 to 15 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 28 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 0 inches
Total snow depth: 9 to 19 inches
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 7000 ft. to 8000 ft.
Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Partly cloudy Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy
Temperatures: 39 to 46 deg. F. 26 to 32 deg. F. 41 to 48 deg. F.
Wind Direction: Variable shifting to the east in the afternoon Southeast South
Wind Speed: Light in the morning increasing to 10 to 15 mph in the afternoon 10 to 15 mph with gusts 25 mph in the evening 10 to 15 mph decreasing in the afternoon
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
For 8000 ft. to 9000 ft.
Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Partly cloudy Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy
Temperatures: 38 to 45 deg. F. 24 to 31 deg. F. 39 to 46 deg. F.
Wind Direction: East Southeast South
Wind Speed: 10 to 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph in the morning 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph in the evening 10 to 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph in the morning becoming light in the afternoon
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Tahoe National Forest and the Sierra Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the Central Sierra Nevada Mountains between Yuba Pass on the north and Ebbetts Pass on the south. Click here for a map of the forecast area. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires 24 hours after the posted time unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.