THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON November 24, 2015 @ 6:55 am
Avalanche Advisory published on November 23, 2015 @ 6:55 am
Issued by Brandon Schwartz - Tahoe National Forest

Avalanche danger remains LOW for all elevations and aspects. Normal caution is advised. Expect increased avalanche danger Tuesday/Wednesday as a well advertised storm impacts the region.

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Normal Caution
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

Generally stable snowpack conditions exist across the forecast area. There are no specific avalanche problems requiring specific management for travel in and below avalanche terrain beyond normal caution. Standard backcountry travel practices such as one at a time travel through or below avalanche terrain and avoiding grouping up in avalanche run out zones remains appropriate during LOW danger.

In areas where the snowpack is 1 to 2+ feet deep, a structure of slab over relatively weaker snow below is often found. The relatively weaker, once faceted snow in most cases is rounding and gaining strength. Spacial variability exists. The degree of slab formation and the amount of rounding/faceting in the snow below the slab varies widely from one location to another.

recent observations

Recent observations from the Mount Rose, Carson Pass, and Donner Summit areas indicate improving snowpack stability. Recent snowpit tests performed in areas with a slab over weaker snow structure and in areas of relatively greater faceting or slower rounding have not given indications of a problematic weak layer. A wide spectrum of snow surface conditions exist by aspect, elevation, and wind exposure. Recent warm air temperatures have caused melt in sun exposed areas. Bare ground has reemerged on numerous SE-S-SW aspects. Above treeline, wind scouring has also left behind a very shallow snowpack and areas of bare ground. On the wind protected NW-N-NE-E aspects, mixed conditions are found consisting of melt-freeze snow, breakable crust, and pockets of cold unconsolidated surface snow in the form of poorly developed near surface facets.

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

One more mild day today in the mountains before a well advertised change in the weather occurs. For today expect a mix of clouds and sun, maximum daytime air temperatures above 7,000' in the mid 30s to mid 40s, and moderate speed SW winds. Ridgetop winds are forecast to increase to gale force tonight into tomorrow. A cooling trend is expected tomorrow with the arrival of snowfall during the daytime hours. For more information on the upcoming storm including overall snow totals, etc, please see the Winter Storm Watch from the NWS Reno office.

Weather observations from along the Sierra Crest between 8200 ft. and 8800 ft.
0600 temperature: 35 to 40 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 45 to 51 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: SW
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 27 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 39 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 0 inches
Total snow depth: 8 to 17 inches
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Reno NWS
For 7000 ft. to 8000 ft.
Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Mostly cloudy skies, becoming partly cloudy. Partly cloudy skies. Mostly cloudy skies becoming cloudy. A chance of snow in the morning. Snow in the afternoon.
Temperatures: 40 to 47 deg. F. 22 to 29 deg. F. 25 to 32 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SW SW SW
Wind Speed: 15 to 25 mph with gusts to 35 mph. 20 to 25 mph with gusts to 40 mph, increasing to 30 to 35 mph with gusts to 50 mph after midnight. 30 to 40 mph with gusts to 60 mph.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 70% probability 2 to 5 in. / 30% probability 4 to 6 in.
For 8000 ft. to 9000 ft.
Monday Monday Night Tuesday
Weather: Mostly cloudy skies, becoming partly cloudy. Partly cloudy skies. Mostly cloudy skies becoming cloudy. A chance of snow in the morning. Snow in the afternoon.
Temperatures: 36 to 43 deg. F. 21 to 28 deg. F. 22 to 29 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SW SW SW
Wind Speed: 20 to 30 mph with gusts to 50 mph. 35 to 40 mph with gusts to 60 mph, increasing to 50 to 55 mph with gusts to 80 mph after midnight. 55 to 65 mph with gusts to 90 mph. Gusts increasing to 100 mph in the afternoon.
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 70% probability 4 to 6 in. / 30% probability 8 to 12 in.
Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Tahoe National Forest and the Sierra Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the Central Sierra Nevada Mountains between Yuba Pass on the north and Ebbetts Pass on the south. Click here for a map of the forecast area. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires 24 hours after the posted time unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.